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Coos Bay Properties Blog

Jan Delimont


Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 190

RE/MAX South Coast - Sponsors A Night at the Movies

by Jan Delimont

Mark your calendars for Friday night at the movies on October 16th, 7:30 pm at the Egyptian Theater.  Re/Max South Coast is sponsoring the inspiring movie Chariots of Fire to benefit the SMART program. 


by Jan Delimont
Moving Day Tips  



Take an objective look at what you own and decide what can be left behind. Extra weight on a moving van costs more. hand                                                holding boxes.jpg
Organize a garage sale if you have items worth selling.
Contact moving companies and get estimates. Pay attention both to cost and what the mover will do to make your move as smooth as possible. Ask for estimates to include the option of having the company pack some or all of your belongings. The time and effort you save might be worth the cost.
While the mover is liable for breakage to any items it packs, you are responsible for damage to items you have boxed.
Start a central file for all the details of your move. A brightly colored organizer folder with pockets is less likely to be misplaced. Collect all receipts for moving-related expenses. Depending on the reason for the move, you may be entitled to a tax deduction.
Draw a floor plan of your new home and consider where you’ll want to place the furniture. Mark and label specific pieces of furniture on your diagram. If a piece of furniture won’t fit, don’t take it with you.
Make any personal travel arrangements - flights, hotel, rental cars - for your trip.



Select your mover and discuss dates and cost.
Decide whether you want to pack yourself or hire the mover to do it.

Start gathering boxes if you decide to pack by yourself. Your mover can provide boxes best suited for moving, including special containers for clothing on hangers, lamp shades, and dishes.



Notify the post office, magazines, credit-card companies, friends, and family of your change of address. The U.S. Postal Service offers a kit to make this process easier.
Call utilities to schedule disconnection of gas, water, electricity, telephone, and cable TV on the day following your move.
Talk with your mover to schedule disconnection service of major appliances being moved a few days before your move.
Complete any repair work on your old home and arrange for services needed at your new home.
Start your self-packing with seldom-used items; fancy dishes, specialty cookware, nonessential clothing, curios, decorative items.



entry                                    family moving.jpg

Inventory your everyday household goods such as radios, pots, pans, and small appliances.
Decide which you will discard.
Start your serious self-packing. Label contents of all boxes.
Make sure you have your driver’s license, auto registration, and insurance records.
Plan food purchases to have as little as possible in the freezer and refrigerator by the time you
move. Use all frozen items
Arrange to clean your new home as close to move-in as possible.
Arrange for copies of school and medical records and make bank safe-deposit arrangements in
your new town.
Hold a garage sale.




Check with your insurance company to cancel current insurance or transfer coverage to new home.
Meet with your bank to change account status.
Transfer prescriptions to drug store in your new town.
Cancel delivery services.
Have your car serviced if you will be driving it to your new location.




Mow your lawn.
Dispose of toxic and flammable items. Drain gasoline and oil from gas-powered tools such as mowers and snow blowers.
Movers won’t take them if they are full.
Arrange for child care on moving day if you have young children.
Pack a suitcase with clothes for the move.
Put your “open first” (load last) boxes in a separate place so the mover can identify them.
Pay outstanding bills.




Expect movers to arrive to start packing.
Empty and defrost refrigerator and freezer; clean both with disinfectant and let them air out. Put baking soda inside to
keep them fresh.
Arrange for payment to the moving company.
Empty your safe-deposit box. Plan to take important papers, jewelry, cherished family photos, irreplaceable mementos,
and vital computer files with you.
Write directions to your new home for the van operator, provide the new phone number and include numbers where you
can be reached in transit.
Leave your forwarding address and phone number for your home’s new occupants.




Remove linens from beds and pack in an “open first” box.
Review all details and paperwork when movers arrive. Accompany van operator to take inventory. Verify delivery plans.
Give home final cleaning.




If you arrive before the movers, tidy up your new home. This is a good time to line cupboards with shelving paper. Couple moving sold.jpg
Unpack your car.
Check to make sure utilities have been connected and follow up on any delays.
Confine pets in out-of-the-way room or consider boarding them overnight at a local kennel.
Plan to be present when the moving van arrives.
Assign oversight duties: One person should check the inventory sheets as items are unloaded; a second person should direct the movers on where to place items.
Once items are unloaded, unpack only what you’ll need for the first day or two. Give yourself at least two weeks to unpack and organize your belongings.


How to get the most back from the IRS for a move due to a new job



The distance between new job and former home is at least 50 miles
Full-time employment at new job is for at least 39 weeks during the 12 months following the move (business owners must work 78 weeks within 24 months).

- Write off costs of:


• Packing, shipping


• Up to 30 days of storage


• Travel (One trip)

RMLS Market Action - Coos County - August 2015

by Jan Delimont

From THE REALTY TIMES - Real Estate News and Advice

by Jan Delimont

How To Build Your Home Equity Now

Written by Blanche Evans on Wednesday, 09 September 2015 11:17 am


There are three ways to build equity, or ownership, when you buy a home. One is to put money down in a down payment. The second is to pay your lender back, and the third is to take advantage of market upswings.

It's no secret that market momentum has been helping homeowners for a few years. Sales volume is still climbing, says the National Association of REALTORS®. You can still take advantage of low housing supplies and low interest rates to invest in a home.

One way to build equity is to put more money down on the home you want to buy. Lenders have returned to tried and true models of income to debt ratios and requiring that borrowers put more money down when they purchase a home. The more you put down, the more instant equity you have. Putting more money down also helps lower borrowing costs because it lowers risk for the lender.

As you make your house payments, you build equity slowly because interest payments at the beginning of a loan are much heavier than the money paid toward principal. The longer you own your home, the less you'll pay in interest and a greater share will go toward ownership, or building equity.

For example, if you borrow $250,000 at 5%, your monthly payment is $1,342.05. The first month you'll pay $1041.67 in interest, and only $300.39 toward reducing your principal. At that rate, building equity may seem like it takes forever. But only two years later, your interest rate lowers by $30 a month allowing $30 more to go toward reducing what you owe your lender.

You can build equity faster by adding a little more to your payment, which removes hundreds of dollars in interest and allows you to own your home in full much faster.

The other way to build equity is to allow the market to do it for you. Home values historically beat inflation by one to two percentage points, but the last decade has been anything but typical. However, all markets return to the norm, so assuming a normal market is on the way, on the modest side, your home should appreciate approximately one percent annually.

In theory, if you purchased your home for $300,000, your home should gain $3000 in value in one year. Home values are expected to rise about seven percent in 2015, so if you buy a home now, you could still do well.

Market variables from the weather to the Fed can all play a part in how quickly your home builds market equity. But one thing is certain, you can't build equity unless you're invested.

Pending Home Sales Inch Forward in July

by Jan Delimont

Pending Home Sales Inch Forward in July

Media Contact: Adam DeSanctis / 202-383-1178

WASHINGTON (August 27, 2015) — Pending home sales were mostly unchanged in July, but rose modestly for the sixth time in seven months, according to the National Association of Realtors®.

The Pending Home Sales Index,* a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, marginally increased 0.5 percent to 110.9 in July from an upwardly revised 110.4 in June and is now 7.4 percent above July 2014 (103.3). The index has increased year-over-year for 11 consecutive months and is the third highest reading of 2015, behind April (111.6) and May (112.3).

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says the housing market began the second half of 2015 on a positive note, with pending sales slightly rising in July. "Led by a solid gain in the Northeast, contract activity in most of the country held steady last month, which bodes well for existing-sales to maintain their recent elevated pace to close out the summer," he said. "While demand and sales continue to be stronger than earlier this year, Realtors® have reported since the spring that available listings in affordable price ranges remain elusive for some buyers trying to reach the market and are likely holding back sales from being more robust."

Looking ahead, with inventory shortages likely to persist into the fall, Yun expects the national median existing-home price to increase 6.3 percent in 2015 to $221,400. Yun forecasts total existing-home sales this year to increase 7.1 percent to around 5.29 million, about 25 percent below the prior peak set in 2005 (7.08 million).

"In light of the recent volatility in the stock market, it's possible some prospective buyers may err on the side of caution and delay decisions, while others may view real estate as a more stable asset in the current environment," said Yun. "Overall, the prospects for ongoing strength in the housing market remain intact for now. The U.S. economy is growing — albeit at a modest pace — and the labor market continues to add jobs."

Adds Yun, "Uncertainty in the equity markets — even if the Fed raises short-term rates in September — could stabilize long-term mortgage rates and preserve affordability for buyers."

The PHSI in the Northeast increased 4.0 percent to 98.8 in July, and is now 12.1 percent above a year ago. In the Midwest the index remained unchanged at 107.8 in July, and is now 5.7 percent above July 2014.

Pending home sales in the South increased slightly (0.6 percent) to an index of 124.2 in July and are now 6.5 percent above last July. The index in the West declined 1.4 percent in July to 103.0, but is still 7.5 percent above a year ago.

The National Association of Realtors®, "The Voice for Real Estate," is America's largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

# # #

*The Pending Home Sales Index is a leading indicator for the housing sector, based on pending sales of existing homes. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is finalized within one or two months of signing.

The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales. In developing the model for the index, it was demonstrated that the level of monthly sales-contract activity parallels the level of closed existing-home sales in the following two months.

An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2001, which was the first year to be examined. By coincidence, the volume of existing-home sales in 2001 fell within the range of 5.0 to 5.5 million, which is considered normal for the current U.S. population.

Prepping for Sale - Sprucing Up the Laundry Room

by Jan Delimont
Prepping for Sale: Spruce Up the Laundry Room
Prepping for Sale: Spruce Up the Laundry Room

Sat, August 9, 2014

In many houses, laundry rooms are little more than semi-neglected utilitarian spaces best left unseen – not an impression you want to make if you’re selling your home.
If your laundry space needs some care, follow these organization and decorating tips to upgrade or cleverly conceal it. 

Closet Up
Laundry rooms are tucked into many different places in a home, including the garage, basement, utility room, the kitchen and, in some urban homes, even the bathroom.
That’s where cabinets can come into play. A cabinetmaker can build an enclosure for the washer and dryer alone or for your entire laundry setup. You can also purchase cabinetry at a home improvement store and install it yourself. 

When possible, conceal your laundry space with doors that match or complement other doors in your home. Avoid the conspicuous "accordion" door often found on laundry closets in older homes.  Alternatives include a sliding-door track system or even curtain panels. Curtains are a cheaper, softer and less permanent way to separate and hide your laundry.

Become Shelf Conscious
If your main concern is to conceal a bulky, full-size washer and dryer, a countertop installed directly above the appliances discreetly says, nothing to see here, folks! Use the countertop space as a display shelf during showings. Install a rod and curtain underneath to hide the machines from view.

Color Cleverly
Coordination is key when it comes to camouflaging a laundry room. Choose soothing, neutral palettes for curtains, wood and paint in your laundry space.
If the laundry room lacks cabinetry or shelving, use baskets and storage cubes in a coordinating color scheme to conceal detergent, hangers and clothes.

Show Discipline in Decor
Put laundry room knickknacks away. The last thing you need when sprucing up your laundry space is a cutesy sign that reads "Loads of fun" or "Drop pants here." Choose laundry area decor that is not personal or specific to cleaning. Homebuyers gravitate toward places they can easily picture living in ­– not picture you living in.

There are many easy ways to minimize your home’s flaws and highlight its best features. If you’re thinking about selling your home, contact your local RE/MAX agent for guidance on everything from quick upgrades to pricing, contract negotiations and support throughout the selling process

RMLS Market Action - Coos County - July 2015

by Jan Delimont


by Jan Delimont

4 Expenses You Avoid When Working With a Seller’s Agent

Fri, July 31, 2015

Selling your home yourself may be tempting. Hold a few open houses, trudge through some paperwork, and save by not paying an agent’s fee, right?

Think again. Statistics show sellers tend to make more money when they hire a professional Realtor. According to the National Association of Realtors®, the typical agent-assisted home sale typically has a 13 percent higher sales price than the typical “For Sale By Owner,” or FSBO, sale.1

Here are a just a few ways you save with an agent.

1. The price is right
Pricing your property can be the most challenging part of selling your home. Starting too high may mean your home languishes on the market. Once you start dropping the price, buyers may assume you are desperate and will submit even lower offers. On the flipside, starting too low means you’ll leave money on the table. A Realtor can help you price your home correctly to avoid these pitfalls.  

2. Marketing
Paying up front for online listings, mailers and signs to market your home can be expensive. Not only do many agents have connections that can get you a great deal, they can also help to make the process much less stressful.

3. Negotiations
Even when your home is priced appropriately, you’re still likely to find yourself at the negotiating table. Agents are well practiced in the art of debate, and will go to bat to make sure you get a fair price.

4. Time is money
Creating marketing materials, arranging showings and finding contractors to make necessary updates costs you both time and money. Handing off duties to a Realtor not only opens up your schedule, but can also help you sell your home faster than you would on your own.

From The National Association of Realtors - July 22, 2015

by Jan Delimont

Existing-Home Sales Rise in June as Home Prices Surpass July 2006 Peak

Media Contact: Adam DeSanctis / 202-383-1178 / Email

WASHINGTON (July 22, 2015) — Existing-home sales increased in June to their highest pace in over eight years, while the cumulative effect of rising demand and limited supply helped push the national median sales price to an all-time high, according to the National Association of Realtors®. All major regions experienced sales gains in June and have now risen above year-over-year levels for six consecutive months.

Total existing-home sales1, which are completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, increased 3.2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.49 million in June from a downwardly revised 5.32 million in May. Sales are now at their highest pace since February 2007 (5.79 million), have increased year-over-year for nine consecutive months and are 9.6 percent above a year ago (5.01 million).

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says backed by June's solid gain in closings, this year's spring buying season has been the strongest since the downturn. "Buyers have come back in force, leading to the strongest past two months in sales since early 2007," he said. "This wave of demand is being fueled by a year-plus of steady job growth and an improving economy that's giving more households the financial wherewithal and incentive to buy."

Adds Yun, "June sales were also likely propelled by the spring's initial phase of rising mortgage rates, which usually prods some prospective buyers to buy now rather than wait until later when borrowing costs could be higher."

The median existing-home price2 for all housing types in June was $236,400, which is 6.5 percent above June 2014 and surpasses the peak median sales price set in July 2006 ($230,400). June's price increase also marks the 40th consecutive month of year-over-year gains.

Total housing inventory3 at the end of June inched 0.9 percent to 2.30 million existing homes available for sale, and is 0.4 percent higher than a year ago (2.29 million). Unsold inventory is at a 5.0-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 5.1 months in May.

"Limited inventory amidst strong demand continues to push home prices higher, leading to declining affordability for prospective buyers," said Yun. "Local officials in recent years have rightly authorized permits for new apartment construction, but more needs to be done for condominiums and single-family homes."

The percent share of first-time buyers fell to 30 percent in June from 32 percent in May, but remained at or above 30 percent for the fourth consecutive month. A year ago, first-time buyers represented 28 percent of all buyers.

According to Freddie Mac, the average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage rose in June to 3.98 from 3.84 percent in May, but remained just below 4.00 percent for the seventh straight month.

Properties typically stayed on the market for 34 days in June, down from May (40 days) and the shortest time since NAR began tracking in May 2011. Short sales were on the market the longest at a median of 129 days in June, while foreclosures sold in 39 days and non-distressed homes took 33 days. Forty-seven percent of homes sold in June were on the market for less than a month — the highest percentage since June 2013 (also 47 percent).

NAR President Chris Polychron, executive broker with 1st Choice Realty in Hot Springs, Ark., says Realtors® are reporting drastic imbalances of supply in relation to demand in many metro areas — especially in the West. "The demand for buying has really heated up this summer, leading to multiple bidders and homes selling at or above asking price4," he said. "Furthermore, tight inventory conditions are being exacerbated by the fact that some homeowners are hesitant to sell because they're not optimistic they'll have adequate time to find an affordable property to move into."

Matching the lowest share since December 2009, all-cash sales were 22 percent of transactions in June, down from 24 percent in May and 32 percent a year ago. Individual investors, who account for many cash sales, purchased 12 percent of homes in June (14 percent in May) — the lowest since August 2014 (also 12 percent) and down from 16 percent in June 2014. Sixty-six percent of investors paid cash in June.

Distressed sales5 — foreclosures and short sales — fell to 8 percent in June (matching an August 2014 low) from 10 percent in May, and are below the 11 percent share a year ago. Six percent of June sales were foreclosures and 2 percent were short sales. Foreclosures sold for an average discount of 15 percent below market value in June (unchanged from May), while short sales were discounted 18 percent (16 percent in May).

Single-family and Condo/Co-op Sales

Single-family home sales increased 2.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.84 million in June from 4.71 million in May, and are now 9.8 percent above the 4.41 million pace a year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $237,700 in June, up 6.6 percent from June 2014 and surpassing the peak median sales price set in July 2006 ($230,900).

Existing condominium and co-op sales rose 6.6 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 650,000 units in June from 610,000 units in May, up 8.3 percent from June 2014 (600,000 units) and the highest pace since May 2007 (680,000 units). The median existing condo price was $226,500 in June, which is 5.5 percent above a year ago and the highest since August 2007 ($229,200).

Regional Breakdown

June existing-home sales in the Northeast climbed 4.3 percent to an annual rate of 720,000, and are now 12.5 percent above a year ago. The median price in the Northeast was $281,200, which is 3.9 percent higher than June 2014.

In the Midwest, existing-home sales rose 4.7 percent to an annual rate of 1.33 million in June, and are 12.7 percent above June 2014. The median price in the Midwest was $190,000, up 7.2 percent from a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the South increased 2.3 percent to an annual rate of 2.20 million in June, and are 7.3 percent above June 2014. The median price in the South was $205,000, up 7.2 percent from a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the West rose 2.5 percent to an annual rate of 1.24 million in June, and are 8.8 percent above a year ago. The median price in the West was $328,900, which is 9.9 percent above June 2014.

# # #

NOTE: For local information, please contact the local association of Realtors® for data from local multiple listing services. Local MLS data is the most accurate source of sales and price information in specific areas, although there may be differences in reporting methodology.

1Existing-home sales, which include single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, are based on transaction closings from Multiple Listing Services. Changes in sales trends outside of MLSs are not captured in the monthly series. NAR rebenchmarks home sales periodically using other sources to assess overall home sales trends, including sales not reported by MLSs.

Existing-home sales, based on closings, differ from the U.S. Census Bureau's series on new single-family home sales, which are based on contracts or the acceptance of a deposit. Because of these differences, it is not uncommon for each series to move in different directions in the same month. In addition, existing-home sales, which account for more than 90 percent of total home sales, are based on a much larger data sample — about 40 percent of multiple listing service data each month — and typically are not subject to large prior-month revisions.

The annual rate for a particular month represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative pace for that month were maintained for 12 consecutive months. Seasonally adjusted annual rates are used in reporting monthly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity. For example, home sales volume is normally higher in the summer than in the winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and family buying patterns. However, seasonal factors cannot compensate for abnormal weather patterns.

Single-family data collection began monthly in 1968, while condo data collection began quarterly in 1981; the series were combined in 1999 when monthly collection of condo data began. Prior to this period, single-family homes accounted for more than nine out of 10 purchases. Historic comparisons for total home sales prior to 1999 are based on monthly single-family sales, combined with the corresponding quarterly sales rate for condos.

2The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical of market conditions than average prices, which are skewed higher by a relatively small share of upper-end transactions. The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to seasonality in buying patterns. Month-to-month comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns. Changes in the composition of sales can distort median price data. Year-ago median and mean prices sometimes are revised in an automated process if additional data is received.

The national median condo/co-op price often is higher than the median single-family home price because condos are concentrated in higher-cost housing markets. However, in a given area, single-family homes typically sell for more than condos as seen in NAR's quarterly metro area price reports.

3Total inventory and month's supply data are available back through 1999, while single-family inventory and month's supply are available back to 1982 (prior to 1999, single-family sales accounted for more than 90 percent of transactions and condos were measured only on a quarterly basis).

4According to NAR's Realtors® Confidence Index, roughly 38 percent of properties sold last month went at or above asking price, which is also the average for the past three months. Before April 2015, the average was 32 percent (since NAR began tracking this monthly data in December 2012).

5Distressed sales (foreclosures and short sales), days on market, first-time buyers, all-cash transactions and investors are from a monthly survey for the NAR's Realtors® Confidence Index, posted at

NOTE: The Pending Home Sales Index for June will be released July 29, and Existing-Home Sales for July will be released August 20; release times are 10:00 a.m. EDT.

RMLS Market Action - Coos County - June 2015

by Jan Delimont

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 190




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Jan Delimont, Broker/Owner, RE/MAX South Coast 1750 Sherman Avenue, North Bend OR 97459
Jan Delimont provides information on real estate and homes for sale
in the Southern Oregon area.

 I list and sell residential real estate including freestanding homes, condominiums and townhomes
as well as investment properties, vacant land and lots for sale in the Southern Oregon real estate area.